Glorious War

Glorious War

The Civil War Adventures of George Armstrong Custer

Glorious War, the Civil War Adventures of George Armstrong CusterThere are certain figures in the annals of history that are either fortunately or unfortunately known for a single piece of their life.  The culmination of other merits or downfalls are often overlooked.  One man could be remembered for a great literary work, and not for his long string of failures in life.  Or in the case of General George Armstrong Custer, he is remembered for a single failure rather than for his dedicated and honorable military career.  Many Americans cannot tell you where he was born, how he was raised, or how he became a general during the Civil War.  Thom Hatch in his work Glorious War, The Civil War Adventures of George Armstrong Custer seeks to change this =.  The life of Custer was an interesting one, and now more well known thanks to Thom Hatch.

Often historians and professors of history and military only speak of his failure, yet George Armstrong Custer fought victoriously for much of the war and played a much larger par in the Civil War.  Thom Hatch has compiled a detailed account of General Custer’s life from his childhood all the way up to his death.  It is filled with surprising facts and accounts, like the role Custer had to play in the epic Battle of Gettysburg as a newly minted General protecting the rear of the Union lines heroically charging the rebels.  Only one week prior to this important battle Custer had been named to the rank of general.  Custer though had already gained experience leading charges and making decisions and commands in the heat of battle.  From the reason behind his girlish locks, to the accidental long charge through enemy lines, to his persistent pursuit of military success and the dedicated pursuit of his future bride, there is much more to learn about this Civil War Hero and historical figure.

Hatch’s Glorious War is a good read for any history or military buff.  Chalked full of interesting facts and stories about Custer and other important figures involved in the Civil War, there is something for everyone to learn in this work.  I definitely enjoyed reading about this enigmatic figure who received an endorsement to West Point from his local politician as a way to get Custer away from his daughter, about how he was a prankster at West Point, and how he somehow went from class clown to military hero.  It is a good read, that is well written in a straightforward and story telling manner.  There is no overly flowery language or fluff in this book.  It is not overly long or taxing either.  Stuff this guy into the Easter Baskets of the history or military buffs in your life – they’ll be sure to enjoy it.