Mr. President

Mr. President

Harlow Giles Unger

Mr. PresidentHarlow Giles Unger, Author of John Quincy Adams has compiled a new work discussing the most enigmatic character in our nation’s history, George Washington, and the formation of the office of the presidency. This latest book, Mr. President, George Washington and the Making of the Nation’s Highest Office is a skillful and detailed history of America’s founder and new structure of Government. Giles has left no letter uncovered, opinion untold or issue avoided, making this work a comprehensive account of the public and private life of our first president, George Washington as he led our nation in its infancy. From the rumblings through the camps of unpaid, unfed and poorly clothed soldiers awaiting the official peace, through the articles of the confederation, to the Whiskey Rebellion all the way up until Washingtons’ farewell, retirement and death, it seems as though there is something for every reader to discover – no matter how well read they might be.

Mr. President is not your average history book. Full of colorful testimonies, anecdotes, descriptions of the additional founding fathers and their arguments and opinions, Unger will keep your attention all while increasing your knowledge of history. Personally, I have to admit that I am not as well read on this crucial period of our history as a citizen of this great nation should be. Harlow Giles Unger has provided readers like me with a digestible and memorable lesson about both George Washington and his role in the growth and maturation of the United States of America. With my short attention span, I have, in the past, picked up books on similar topics only to lose interest – not because of the subject matter, but because of the writing style. I very much appreciated the style and dedication of Harlow Giles Unger.

A great addition to any book collection, Mr President, George Washington and the Making of the Nation’s Highest Office is a must read for any avid historian. Unger includes both period and modern perspectives and implications for the seven pillars of power that Washington added to the executive office during his presidency. With a solid understanding of these pillars, I am now better able to grasp the issues that face us in our present day, as well as the precedents for the behavior of our modern presidency. I wish this book would have been around during my high school and college American history classes as it is a phenomenal resource.