Red Sky in the Morning

Red Sky in the Morning

By: Paul Linch

Red Sky in the MorningEvery so often you read a book that picks you up and transports you to another time and place.  Red Sky in the Morning by Paul Lynch is just such a book.  Set in rural Ireland in a time past this tale of sorrow and strife will whisk you away from the mundane or everyday while tugging at your heart strings.  Broken into three parts this book takes a major turn with each.  Lynch keeps you guessing as to where Coyle’s story will take you next as you hope with will be somewhere better than the last.  This book is of a different breed, definitely unique.  If you are looking for a shorter read that is a change of pace as well as scenery this read is a good one for you.  This is a good fictional story, written so well that it feels like is could be a family story passed down through generations.

The artistry that is needed to verbally paint the world of 1832 in both Ireland and America is stunning.  From colloquialisms to patterns of speech Lynch mastered the craft of story telling with this work.  Red Sky in the Morning was raw and harsh.  It is the story of a tough life that ensued when the man figure of the book murdered the father of a revenge thirsty villain.  From the Irish countryside, to the belly of a sailing ship, to the work camp in the new world Lynch makes you feel the story.  This is not a book that you simply read.  The smells will fill your nostrils.  The sounds will haunt your ears.  And the emotions will leave your heart feeling raw.  From cover to cover Paul Lynch guides you through this tale like a grandfather to his youth beside a fire, on the earthen floor of an Irish cottage.

My only complaint about Red Sky in the Morning is written in a very different style and it took longer than I would have liked to read. The lack of quotation marks made it necessary to re-read certain passages to determine who was speaking, whether it was an internal thought, or what they were speaking about.  This is just my take on the style of writing and I do not think that it detracts from actual storyline.  If you are looking for an easy read this might not be the one for you at the moment is my point.  Aside from this one grammatical difference, Paul Lynch’s book held a complex story, that continually progressed as it was artfully told and kept you wanting to read more.