The Woman Who Stopped Traffic

The Woman Who Stopped Traffic

By: Daniel Pembrey

The Woman Who Stopped TrafficThere are books and then there are stories.  There is the ability to write, and the ability to tell a story, to craft a tale so artfully that the reader is transported or captivated.  Daniel Pembrey’s The Woman Who Stopped Traffic is an example of artfully crafted story about a very complex and well-developed main character in Natalie Chevalier.  Natalie is yoga practitioner and instructor.  She specializes in computer security and ends up working for a social media company all the while spurred by a tenacious attitude.   With a main character this dynamic, the plot, the story line must be equally as multifaceted.  In The Woman Who Stopped Traffic the reader is brought through a complex series of events.  These events are as surprising and excited as the qualities in Natalie Chavelier the main character.

Daniel Premberey has gifted us a great read just in time for the holidays.  Natalie Chevalier a corporate security specialist turned yoga instructor in the Bahamas has come back into the world of technology and industry.  What she thought would be a short visit turned into a much more complicated and tangled mystery.   Friends are not what they seem, murders are a foot, and something is going on under the surface with an enormous financial sale of the stock of an emerging social media company – but most interesting or unsettling is the connection that this deal has to human trafficking of young girls from the other side of the world.  In Pembrey’s The Woman Who Stopped Traffic we are given a complex story that is skillfully woven much to the readers enjoyment.

As a former yoga instructor, working in social media with a former job marketing computer security training programs this story practically jumped off the shelf for me.  It was great to catch a glimpse into the back end or the private side of social media giants like Facebook in their infancy and how they are taken public.  In some places the financial jargon was a bit beyond my grasp and felt a bit heavy but then again I run from numbers every chance I get.  For the much more analytic or financially oriented mind these sections might be juicy or savory enhancements to the story.   Overall this was a well-rounded book – and as I just hinted at, has something for everyone.  Daniel Pembrey’s The Woman Who Stopped Traffic was a great read and I look forward to more of his works.